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Event Details 
Distinguished Lecture Series Session 2
The OLLI Distinguished Lecture Series consists of ten lectures. Most are held on Tuesday mornings at 10:00 a.m., once per month from September through June. The speakers are well-informed experts from town and gown who share their specialized knowledge in an engaging manner. Each lecture is just the beginning; a stimulating question-and-answer period follows most sessions, and frequently there is an opportunity to join the speaker at a dutch-treat lunch afterwards. The speakers for Lecture Series Session 2 are: February 14: The Importance of the Private Equity Markets, by David Brophy March 14: Why Big History? Why Now? The Case for Adding 14 Billion Years of History to Education, by Bob Bain April 4: Emergency Medicine--The Good Things Wars Give Us!, by Gregory Henry (1st rather than 2nd Tuesday of the month) May 9: Self-Medication by Animals in the Great Green Pharmacy, by Mark Hunter June 13: The Vanishing American Corporation: Navigating the Hazards of a New Economy, by Gerald Davis -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Detailed descriptions February 14: The Importance of the Private Equity Markets, by David Brophy Dr. Brophy received his Ph. D. from Ohio State University and is the Director of the Office for the Study of Private Equity Finance in the University of Michigan Graduate School of Business. His teaching areas are Venture Capital Finance, Private Equity Finance, Global Private Equity, Financing Research Commercialization, and Entrepreneurial Finance Valuation. Dr. Brophy will talk about the pricing of private equity and the initial public offerings of common stock. He will expand on the value and characteristics of the venture capital market and it’s effect on innovation and resilience of our economy. March 14: Why Big History? Why Now? The Case for Adding 14 Billion Years of History to Education, by Bob Bain Bob Bain is the Associate Professor in the Education, History and Museum Studies at the University of Michigan. Professor Bain has received awards for teaching at both the high school and university levels, including the College Educator of the Year Award from the Michigan Council of Social Studies in both 2008 and 2011. Today we have more information available to us electronically than is held in many libraries. How do we make sense of all of the information coming our way? How do we decide what claims we can trust? The Big History Project tackles these challenges by helping students form big pictures of the past, present, and the future as well as teaching effective ways to examine claims. The Big History Project, a free course for high schools, was created because of Bill Gates’ personal interest in providing this big-picture, problem-based class to high school students around the world. April 4: Emergency Medicine--The Good Things Wars Give Us!, by Gregory Henry (1st rather than 2nd Tuesday of the month) Dr. Henry is the past President of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the principal professional society for approximately 40,000 emergency physicians across the United States. Dr. Henry was a clinical emergency physician staffing several hospitals in Ann Arbor. He was the former Chief of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Oakwood Hospital for 21 years. Dr. Henry presently serves academically as Clinical Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School. Dr. Henry’s presentation will cover how the specialty of emergency medicine was born, what it does, and where it is going. May 9: Self-Medication by Animals in the Great Green Pharmacy, by Mark Hunter Mark Hunter received his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Oxford. He taught at the University of Georgia before joining the University of Michigan in January 2006. He has published over 140 research articles and six books on ecology and environmental change. He has received both a CAREER Award and an OPUS award from the National Science Foundation and, in 2014, was elected a lifetime Fellow of the Ecological Society of America. Humans have a long history of using plants as sources of medicines. Less well known is how many other animals also exploit plants as a source of pharmaceuticals. This talk describes the phenomenon of self-medication by animals, with a specific focus on monarch butterflies. Monarchs use toxins in plants to protect themselves from disease. Studying animal self-medication may inform drug discovery and help mitigate the evolution of antibiotic resistance. June 13: The Vanishing American Corporation: Navigating the Hazards of a New Economy, by Gerald Davis Gerald F. Davis is Wilbur K. Pierpont Collegiate Professor of Management, University of Michigan Ross School of Business. His recent book is “The Vanishing American Corporation”. Time Magazine describes him as a pre-eminent scholar on financializations of American corporations and new forms of organizations. He questions if viable alternatives to shareholder-owned corporations in the U.S exist. The total U.S. companies listed on the stock exchange dropped by more than half between 1997 and 2012. Some have gone bankrupt (GM, Chrysler, Eastman Kodak). Others have disappeared entirely (Lehman Brothers, Bethlehem Steel, Borders, Circuit City). This decline in public corporations is one of the root causes of income inequality and social instability. Thriving corporations were once an integral part of building a middle class. They offered lifetime employment, stable career paths, health insurance, and pensions to millions. Businesses replacing them are not the same. Consider that the combined global workforces of prominent technology companies such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Yelp, Zillow, and others, now are fewer than those who lost their jobs when Circuit City was liquidated in 2009. The shareholder economy seems to absolve many companies of a sense of obligation to their employees. So what comes next? Will the future increase economic polarization, or provide a more democratic economy built from grass roots? We must decide.
Event Type : Distinguished Lecture Series      
Date(s) : 02/14/2017 - 06/13/2017
Day of Week : Tuesday
Time : 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Location : Rave Cinema
Address : 4100 Carpenter Rd.,
Ypsilanti, MI
Fee : $25.00 (Daypasses are available at the door for $10)
Event Status : OPEN