Event details | Osher Lifelong Learning Institute


Event Details 
Library – Civilization’s Treasure House of Knowledge, The
The collection of written knowledge in some sort of repository is a practice as old as civilization itself. About 30,000 clay tablets found in ancient Mesopotamia date back more than 5,000 years. Aristotle was the first to put together a collection of books (Papyri) and to have taught the kings of Egypt how to arrange a library. In this series we will learn some things about the resulting Library of Alexandria, the greatest such institution in the ancient world, built in 300 BCE. During the Renaissance, libraries grew as universities developed. As we celebrate U of M’s bi-centennial, we will discover some of the University’s unique institutions, such as the Clements Library. We will also learn about special collections and hear fascinating stories about people who were instrumental in civil rights, the labor movement and the turbulent times of the 60’s, that are recorded in these collections. We will understand how our libraries are looking to the future and changing to meet the challenges of the digital world. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lectures February 16: ’A GREAT LIBRARY EASILY BEGETS AFFECTION’: THE WILLIAM L. CLEMENTS LIBRARY, J. Kevin Graffagnino, Ph.D. February 23: DETROIT’S REUTHER LIBRARY: AN INTERSECTION OF A CITY, A UNIVERSITY, ORGANIZED LABOR AND SOCIAL JUSTICE, Erik Nordberg NO LECTURE ON MARCH 2. March 9: THE GERALD R. FORD PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY: PEOPLE AND EVENTS BEHIND THE COLLECTIONS, Geir Gundersen and David Horrocks March 16: SAVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE: THE LEGACY OF THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA, Professor Francesca Schironi March 23: DISCOVERING RADICAL HISTORY IN THE JOSEPH A. LABADIE COLLECTION, Julie Herrada March 30: ANDREW CARNEGIE’S LEGACY IS NOT STEEL, Josie Barnes Parker ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Detailed Descriptions February 16: ’A GREAT LIBRARY EASILY BEGETS AFFECTION’: THE WILLIAM L. CLEMENTS LIBRARY, J. Kevin Graffagnino, Ph.D. Kevin Graffagnino is Director of the William L. Clements Library. He grew up in Vermont and has undergraduate and graduate degrees in American History. In a 39-year professional career, he’s held curatorial and administrative positions at the University of Vermont, the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, the Kentucky Historical Society, and the Vermont Historical Society. He’s published a good deal and spoken widely on American history, libraries, historical cartography, and bibliomania. Speaker’s Synopsis: Since its opening in 1923, the Clements has been one of the world’s finest research libraries of early American history. Clements director Kevin Graffagnino’s illustrated presentation details the life and collecting career of Michigan industrialist William L. Clements and the growth of the library Clements built to house his remarkable collection of early Americana. Book collectors, history buffs, and everyone else will learn from this talk why the Clements epitomizes the wisdom of Augustine Birrell’s observation. “A great library easily begets affection, which may deepen into love.” February 23: DETROIT’S REUTHER LIBRARY: AN INTERSECTION OF A CITY, A UNIVERSITY, ORGANIZED LABOR AND SOCIAL JUSTICE, Erik Nordberg Eric Nordberg is Director of the Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs at Wayne State University. He holds a master’s degree in Library Science from WSU and is completing work for a doctoral degree from Michigan Technical University. Mr. Nordberg is a native of the Detroit area and previously served as Executive Director of the Michigan Humanities Council. Speaker’s Synopsis: The Reuther Library is internationally renowned as the most significant collection of records from organized labor in North America. Less known are its extensive collections relating to the history of metropolitan Detroit and the history of Wayne State University. These three collecting themes complement each other and work together to support the current revival of Detroit. The presentation will provide an insight into these efforts and how they relate to some of the individuals whose life stories are revealed in the libraries collections. NO LECTURE ON MARCH 2. March 9: THE GERALD R. FORD PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY: PEOPLE AND EVENTS BEHIND THE COLLECTIONS, Geir Gundersen and David Horrocks Geir Gundersen serves as Supervisory Archivist at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library, where he manages the Library’s archival and public programs. He joined the Ford Library in 1989 and worked previously at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. David Horrocks helped transfer the Ford presidential materials from the White House to Ann Arbor in 1977 and served as Supervisory Archivist at the Ford Library until his retirement from the National Archives in 2012. He previously worked at the Eisenhower Library and the Office of Presidential Libraries. Speakers’ Synopsis: Join current Supervisory Archivist Geir Gundersen and his predecessor David Horrocks as they share stories and anecdotes about the people and events that have helped shape the holdings of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library over the years. Drawing on personal experiences, they will highlight interactions with President and Mrs. Ford, their family, and other donors; favorite holdings and acquisitions; and open the window on the Library’s declassification program, among other things. March 16: SAVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE: THE LEGACY OF THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA, Professor Francesca Schironi Francesca Schironi, Associate Professor of Classics at UM, has worked extensively on Aristarchus of Samothrace (the most important Alexandrian scholar), publishing a collection of his fragments and articles on him and Hellenistic scholarship. She also published an edition with commentary of a papyrus lexicon, a monograph on book-conventions in papyri, and articles on modern reception of the classics. Her new book on Aristarchus’ work on the Iliad is forthcoming with UM press. Speaker’s Synopsis: The lecture will focus on the Library of Alexandria and its legacy, in ancient times and for us. Prof. Schironi will explain how and why it was founded and discuss a few examples of the work carried out by intellectuals during the Library’s golden age. Alexandrian scholars saved masterpieces of Greek literature for us, but their legacy goes far beyond that, and it reminds us why libraries are important and why we should care about them. March 23: DISCOVERING RADICAL HISTORY IN THE JOSEPH A. LABADIE COLLECTION, Julie Herrada Julie Herrada is the Curator of the Joseph A. Labadie Collection of the University of Michigan Library, where she collects, manages, and provides access to holdings related to international social protest movements. She has worked with the collection since 1994, first as the Assistant Curator and as Curator since the year 2000. She holds a Masters in Library Science with a Certificate in Archival Administration from Wayne State University. Speaker’s Synopsis: Marches, rallies, riots! Demonstrations, protests, boycotts, and pickets! SNCC, CORE, SDS, Weatherman, the Chicago 8 conspiracy trial, Tom Hayden’s FBI surveillance files! Where would you go to see the artifacts of these events? Right in your own backyard, that’s where! Enjoy this curator’s introduction to one of the foremost research libraries, documenting social protest movements and the stories about some of the people involved, from the 19th century to the present. March 30: ANDREW CARNEGIE’S LEGACY IS NOT STEEL, Josie Barnes Parker Josie Parker received her MLS from UM in 1996. After working as a children’s librarian and youth department manager in Chelsea and later in Ypsilanti, she came to AADL in 1999. She has been Director since 2002. She serves as a Commissioner on the Michigan Commission for the Blind and the State Library for the Blind in Michigan. She speaks on public library matters to a broad array of groups around the world, but she is happiest speaking to the Ann Arbor community about its public library. Speaker’s Synopsis: Ms. Parker will talk about the treasure that is the Ann Arbor District Library, its mission, challenges, and stories about its founding and special collections. She will relate why our library, unlike most public libraries, is tied to the school district, rather than the municipal government. She will also describe the important role that a Scottish immigrant played in the intellectual life of our country. She will describe some of the joys and challenges in public libraries of today and in the future.
Event Type : Thursday Morning Lecture Series      
Date(s) : 02/16/2017 - 03/30/2017
Day of Week : Thursday, NO LECTURE ON MARCH 2.
Time : 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Location : Rave Cinema
Address : 4100 Carpenter Rd.,
Ypsilanti, MI
Fee : $30.00 (Daypasses are available at the door for $10)
Event Status : COMPLETED