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Torn From the Headlines: The Role of the Supreme Court in Voting Rights Legislation
Torn From the Headlines: The Role of the Supreme Court in Voting Rights Legislation
U-M Assistant Professor Deborah Beim
Please join us Monday, May 10th at 4 pm for a conversation on the role that the Supreme Court might play this term on voting rights and other critical issues. This hour-long Q and A with a national expert is entitled The Role of the Supreme Court in Voting Rights Legislation.  Audience questions will be a vital part of this session. 

The session will be facilitated by Karen Bantel, Ph.D., OLLI member and instructor, and former U-M Professor of Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy.
 
The Supreme Court will hear many critical cases this session, not the least of which will be issues surrounding voter suppression.  The Voting Rights Act of 1965, considered one of the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in the U.S., aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote as guaranteed under the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Yet, more voting restrictions have been enacted over the last decade than at any point since the end of Jim Crow. What trends in U.S. elections and voting have led to these efforts?  If large percentages of Americans believe that the 2020 election was fraudulent and they do not trust our voting system, what are the larger implications for the U.S.?  The role of the Supreme Court is critical, e.g., they heard arguments in March, 2021, for a voting rights case in Arizona. What are the implications of this Supreme Court ruling (expected in July) and others that are anticipated? 
 
Join us Monday, May 10th from 4-5 pm with U-M Assistant Professor Deborah Beim in a Q and A moderated by Karen Bantel, Ph.D., OLLI member and instructor, and former U-M Professor of Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy.

Deborah Beim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Michigan. She studies American politics in general and judicial politics in particular, with a focus on interactions between the U.S. Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeals. She is also interested in applied game theory. Her work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and other outlets. Prior to joining the faculty at Michigan, Professor Beim taught at Yale University.
Lecture Type : Other      
Lecture Date : 05/10/2021      
Program Year : 2020-21      
Term : Winter/Spring      
Fee : $10.00